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Bookmarks for 10 Dec 2013

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  1. MC
    Comment by MC | 2013/12/19 at 14:10:00

    Every so often, software people discover what the hardware guys have been doing for years and are amazed at it. Like test driven development for software, EMC tests on new products are routine for the electronics industry, more so, they have been a regulatory requirement for years. For example in Europe, the EMC directive came in 1989. All electronic products placed on the market since then have to have undergone these sort of tests, and there are quite a few different tests, or an engineering assessment that the tests would pass if they were performed, and have that data available should the need arise to provide it eg to Trading Standards.
    Additionally, many electronics products have to meet the requirements of the Low Voltage Directive before they can have the CE mark applied, which is a legal requirement, and most have to meet RoHS (materials restrictions including lead, cadmium etc) and in some cases WEEE (waste electrical and electronics) and EuP (energy using products, low standby power). You can’t just make something, test for functionality and then sell it.


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  1. MC
    Comment by MC | 2013/12/19 at 14:10:00

    Every so often, software people discover what the hardware guys have been doing for years and are amazed at it. Like test driven development for software, EMC tests on new products are routine for the electronics industry, more so, they have been a regulatory requirement for years. For example in Europe, the EMC directive came in 1989. All electronic products placed on the market since then have to have undergone these sort of tests, and there are quite a few different tests, or an engineering assessment that the tests would pass if they were performed, and have that data available should the need arise to provide it eg to Trading Standards.
    Additionally, many electronics products have to meet the requirements of the Low Voltage Directive before they can have the CE mark applied, which is a legal requirement, and most have to meet RoHS (materials restrictions including lead, cadmium etc) and in some cases WEEE (waste electrical and electronics) and EuP (energy using products, low standby power). You can’t just make something, test for functionality and then sell it.

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